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Saltney Ferry Scout Song Book

 
The following songs are extracted from our group songbook, which now incorporates approximately 300 songs. The songs shown are reasonably well known, and are the most popular around our Camp fires. The list includes Scouting, Guiding, Folk, Hymns, and old chart songs and is listed in alphabetical order.

1. A-ROVING.
At number three Old England Square,
Mark well what I do say;
At number three Old England Square,
My Nancy Dawson she lives there:
And I'll go no more a-roving
With you, fair maid!

CHORUS:-
A-roving, a-roving; since rovings
 been my ru-i-in,
I'll go no more a-roving
With you fair maid!

My Nancy Dawson she lived there,
Mark well what I do say;
She was a lass surpassing fair,
She'd bright blue eyes and golden hair
And I'll go no more a-roving,
With you, fair maid!

CHORUS

I met her first when home from sea,
Mark well what I do say;
Home from the coast of Afrikee,
With pockets lined with good money;
And I'll go no more a-roving
With you fair maid!

CHORUS

Oh! didn't I tell her stories true,
Mark well what I do say;
And didn't I tell her whoppers too!
Of the gold we found in Timbuktu;
And I'll go no more a-roving
With you, fair maid!

CHORUS

But when we'd spent my blooming screw,
Mark well what I do say;
And the whole of the gold from Timbuktu
She cut her stick and vanished too!
And I'll go no more a-roving,
With you, fair maid.

CHORUS

2. ABIDE WITH ME.
Abide with me, fast falls the eventide,
The darkness deepens, Lord with me
 abide;
When other helpers fail, and comforts
 flee,
Help of the helpless, O abide with me.

I need Thy presence every passing hour
What but Thy grace can foil tempter's
 power?
Who like Thyself my guide and stay can
 be?
Through cloud and sunshine, O abide
 with me.

I fear no foe with Thee at hand to
 bless;
Ills have no weight, and tears no
 bitterness.
Where is death's sting? where, grave,
 thy victory?
I triumph still, if Thou abide with me.

3. AFRICAN BOAT SONG.
Zingo za-me, zingo zee-ah
A-way, a-way, a-way.
Zingo za-me, zingo zee-ah
A-way, a-way, a-way.
Bombaala ZIMA, bombaala ZIMA
Bombaala ZIMA ZIMA ZIMA WEH-O-MAH.
Bombaala ZIMA, bombaala ZIMA
Bombaala ZIMA ZIMA ZIMA WEH-O-WAH.

4. ALL ROUND MY HAT.
All round my hat I will wear the green
                                willow;
All round my hat for a twelve month and
                                 a day;
If anybody asks me the reason why, I
                               wear it,
It's all because my true love is far,
                              far away.

My love she was fair, and my love she
                         was kind, too,
And many were the happy hours between
                        my love and me,
I never could refuse her whatever she's
                             a mind to,
And now she's far away, far o'er the
                            stormy sea.

Will my love be true and will my love
                            be faithful
Or will she find another swain to court
                   her when she's gone?
The men will all run after her, so
                pretty and so graceful,
And leave me here lamenting, lamenting
                             all alone.

5. ALL THINGS BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL.
CHORUS:-
All things bright and beautiful,
All creatures great and small,
All things wise and wonderful,
The Lord God made them all.

Each little flower that opens,
Each little bird that sings,
He made their glowing colours,
He made their tiny wings.

CHORUS

The purple-headed mountain,
The river running by,
The sunset and the morning,
That brightens up the sky;

CHORUS

The cold wind in the winter,
The pleasant summer sun,
The ripe fruits in the garden,
He made them every one;

CHORUS

The tall trees in the greenwood,
The meadows where we play,
The rushes by the water,
We gather every day;

CHORUS

He gave us eyes to see them,
And lips that we might tell,
How great is God Almighty,
Who has made all things well.

CHORUS

6. ALOUETTE.
Alouette, gentille Alouette,
Alouette, je te plumerai.
Je te plumerai la tete,
Je te plumerai la tete,
A la tete,
A la tete,
Alouette,
Alouette.

Alouette, gentille Alouette,
Alouette, je te plumerai.
Je te plumerai le cou,
Je te plumerai le cou,
Et le cou,
Et le cou,
A la tete,
A la tete,
Alouette,
Alouette.

Add to verses les yeux, le nez,
                             les pieds.

7. ANIMAL FAIR.
I went to the animal fair
The birds and beasts were there,
The gay baboon by the light of the
                              moon
Was combing his auburn hair;
The monkey fell out of his bunk
Slid down the elephants trunk,
The elephant sneezed and fell on
                        his knees,
And that was the end of the monkey,
      monkey, monkey, monkey,,,,,,

8. ASH GROVE.
The Ash Grove, how graceful,
 how plainly 'tis speaking,
The wind thro' it playing has
 language for me;
When over its branches the
 sunlight is breaking
A host of kind faces is
 gazing on me,
The friends of my childhood
 again are before me,
Fond memories awaken as freely
 I roam,
With soft whispers laden its
 leaves rustle o'er me,
The Ash Grove, The Ash Grove
 that sheltered my home.

My laughter is over, my step
 loses lightness,
Old countryside measures steel
 soft on my ear;
I only remember the past and its
 brightness
The dear ones I mourn for again
 gather here.
From out of the shadows their
 loving looks greet me,
And wistfully searching the
 leafy green dome,
I find other faces fond bending
 to greet me;
The Ash Grove, the Ash Grove
 alone is my home!

9. BABY SARDINE.
A baby sardine saw her first
 submarine,
She was scared and looked through
 the peephole,
Oh come, come, come, said the
 sardines mum,
It's only a tinful of people!
Tra la la la, Tra la la la,
Tra la la la, La la la la.

10. BACK TO GILLWELL.
I used to be a Cuckoo, and a good
 old Cuckoo too,
But now I've finished cuckoo-ing,
 I don't know what to do,
I'm growing old and feeble and I
 can 'cuck no more
So I'm going to work my ticket if
 I can.

CHORUS:-
Back to Gillwell, happy land,
So I'm going to work my ticket if
 I can.

I used to be a 'Pecker and a good
 old 'Pecker too,
But now I've finished 'pecking
 I don't know what to do, etc,,

CHORUS

I used to be a Pigeon, and a good
 old Pigeon too,
But now I've finished pigeoning
 I don't know what to do, etc,,
CHORUS

I used to be a Raven, and a good
 old Raven too,
But now I've finished ravening,
 I don't know what to do, etc,,
CHORUS

11. BARGES.
Out of my window looking into the
 night,
I can see the barges' flickering
 lights.
Silently flows the river to the
 sea,
And the barges too go silently.

CHORUS:-
Barges I would like to go with
 you,
I would like to sail the ocean
 blue,
Barges have you treasure in your
 hold,
Do you fight with pirates brave
 and bold.

Out of my window looking into the
 night,
I can see the barges' flickering
 lights,
Starboard shines the green and
 port is glowing red,
I can see them flickering far ahead.

CHORUS

12. BIRDS IN THE WILDERNESS.
CHORUS:-
Here we sit like birds in the
 wilderness,
Birds in the wilderness,
Birds in the wilderness,
Here we sit like birds in the
 wilderness,
Way down Alabama.

My old massa he bought a horsearum
He bought a horsearum
He bought a horsearum
My old massa he bought a horsearum,
Way down in Alabama.

CHORUS

My old massa he got a kickerum --
My old massa he fell a sickerum --
My old massa he sent for a docturum --
The old doctor couldn't effect a
 cureum --
My old massa he fell a deaderum --

13. BLACK AND WHITE.
The ink is black,
The paint is white.
Together we learn to read and
 write,
Read and write.
And now a child can understand,
That this is the law in all the
 land,
All the land.

The slate is black,
The chalk is white,
The words stand out so clear and
 bright,
Clear and bright.
And now at last we plainly see
The alphabet of liberty,
Liberty.

The child is black,
The child is white,
The whole world looks upon the
 sight,
A beautiful sight,
And now at last the whole world
 knows,
That this is the way that freedom
 grows,
Freedom grows.

The world is black,
The world is white,
It turns by day and it turns by
 night,
It turns by night,
It turns so each and every one
Can take his station in the sun,
In the sun.

Repeat first verse.

14. BLAYDON RACES.
Aa went to Blaydon Races,
'Twas on the ninth of June,
Eighteen hundred and sixty two
 on a summer's afternoon,
Aa tyuk the bus fra Balm-bra's
 and she was heavy laden,
Away we went along Collingwood Street
 that's on the road to Blaydon.

CHORUS:-
Oh! me lads, ye shud a'seen us gannin,
Passin the folks upon the road
Just as they were stannin.
Thor wis lots o' lads and lasses there
All wi smiling faces;
Gannin' along the Scotswood Road
To see the Blaydon Races.

We flew past Armstrong's factory
And up to Robin Adair
Just gannin' doon to the railway bridge
The bus wheel flew off there.
The lasses lost their crinolines
And the veils that hid their faces.
I got two black eyes and a broken nose
In gannin' to Blaydon Races.
CHORUS

When we got the wheel put on
Away we went again,
But them that had their noses broke
They went back home again.
Some went to the dispensary
And some to Doctor Gibbs'
And some to the Infirmary
To mend their broken ribs.
CHORUS

Noo when we got to Paradise
There was a bonny game begun;
There was four and twenty on the bus
Man, how they danced and sung.
They called on me to sing a song
I sung them Paddy Fagan,
I danced a jig and swung me twig
The day we went to Blaydon.
CHORUS

We flew across the Chain Bridge
Reet into Blaydon toon.
The bellman he was caaling there,
They caal him Jacky Broon.
I saw him talking to some chaps
And them he was persuading
To see George Ridley's concert at
the Mechanics Hall at Blaydon.

CHORUS

The rain it poured all day
And made the ground quite muddy
Coffy John had a white hat on
They were shootin "Who stole the cuddy"
There were spice stalls and monkey
 shows,
And the old wives selling ciders,
And a chap wi a Happenny Roondaboot
Shootin "Noo me lads for riders".

CHORUS

15. BREAD AND FISHES.
As I was a walking, one morning in
 Spring,
I met with some travelers, in an old
 country lane.
One was an old man, the second a maid.
The third was a young boy, who smiled
 as he said.

CHORUS:-
With the wind in the willow, and the
 birds in the sky.
There's a bright sun to warm us,
 wherever we lie.
We have bread and fishes, and a jug of
 red wine.
To share on our journey, with all of
 mankind.

I asked them to tell me, their name and
 their race.
As I may remember, their kindness and
 grace.
My name is is Joseph, I am Mary his
 wife
And this is our young son, who is our
 delight.

CHORUS

We're traveling to Glaston, through
 Englands green lanes.
To hear of mens troubles, to hear of
 mens pains.
We've traveled the wide world, over
 land, and the seas.
To tell all the people, how they can be
 free.

CHORUS

So sadly I left them, that old
 country lane.
I know that I never, will see them
 again.
One was an old girl, the second a
 maid.
The third was a young boy, who
 smiled as he said.

CHORUS

16. CAMP FIRE'S BURNING.
Camp fire's burning, camp fire's
 burning,
Draw nearer, draw nearer,
In the gloaming, in the gloaming,
Come sing and be merry.

17. CAMPFIRES BURNING.
Campfire's burning, campfire's burning
Put logs on, put logs on
Higher higher, higher higher
And build up the fire.
 

18. CLEMENTINE.
In a cavern, in a canyon,
Excavating for a mine,
Dwelt a miner, forty-niner,
And his daughter Clementine.

CHORUS:-
Oh my darling, oh my darling,
Oh my darling Clementine!
Thou art lost and gone for ever,
Dreadful sorry, Clementine.

Light she was, and like a fairy,
And her shoes were number nine,
Herring boxes without topses,
Sandals were for Clementine.

CHORUS

Drove she ducklings to the water,
Ev'ry morning just at nine,
Hit her foot against a splinter,
Fell into the foaming brine.

CHORUS

Saw her lips above the water,
Blowing bubbles, mighty fine,
But alas! I was no swimmer,
So I lost my Clementine.

CHORUS

In a corner of the churchyard,
Where the myrtle boughs entwine,
Grow the roses in their posies,
Fertilized by Clementine.

CHORUS

Then the miner, forty-niner,
Soon began to peak and pine,
Thought he "oughter jine" his daughter,
Now he's with his Clementine.

CHORUS

In my dreams she still doth haunt me,
Robed in garments soaked in brine,
Though in life I used to hug her,
Now I've lost my Clementine.

CHORUS

How I missed her, how I missed her,
How I missed my Clementine,
But I kissed her little sister,
And forgot my Clementine.

CHORUS

19. COCK ROBIN.
Who killed Cock Robin?
I said the sparrow,
With my bow and arrow,
I killed Cock Robin.

CHORUS:-
All the birds of the air fell
 a-sighing and a-sobbing,
When they heard of the death of
 poor Cock Robin,
When they heard of the death of
 poor Cock Robin.

Who saw him die?
I said the fly,
With my little eye,
I saw him die.

CHORUS

Who'll toll the bell?
I said the bull,
Because I can pull,
I'll toll the bell.

CHORUS

Who'll dig his grave?
I said the owl,
With my little trowel,
I'll dig his grave.

CHORUS

Who'll be the parson?
I said the rook,
With my bell and book,
I'll be the parson.

CHORUS

Who'll be the chief mourner?
I said the dove,
I'll mourn for my love,
I'll be chief mourner.

CHORUS

20. COCKLES AND MUSSELS.
In Dublin's fair city,
Where the girls are so pretty,
I first set my eyes on sweet
 Molly Malone,
And she wheel'd her wheel-barrow
Thro' streets broad and narrow,
Crying "Cockles and Mussels
 Alive a-live-o!"
 

CHORUS:-
A-live, a-live-o!
A-live, a-live-o!
Crying Cockles and Mussels
A-live, a-live-o!

She was a fishmonger,
But sure 'twas no wonder,
For so were her father and
 mother before,
And they each wheeled their
 barrow
Thro' streets broad and narrow,
Crying "Cockles and Mussels
 A-live a-live-o!"

CHORUS

She died of a fever,
And no one could save her,
And that was the end of sweet
 Molly Malone;
But her ghost wheels a barrow,
Thro' streets broad and narrow,
Crying "Cockles and Mussels
 A-live a-live-o!"
CHORUS

21. COMING ROUND THE MOUNTAIN.
She'll be coming round the mountain
 when she comes (x2)
She'll be coming round the mountain,
Coming round the mountain
She'll be coming round the mountain
 when she comes.

Singing Aye-Aye-Ippy-Ippy-aye
Singing Aye-aye-ippy-ippy-aye
Singing Aye-aye-ippy, aye-aye-ippy
Aye-aye-ippy-ippy-aye,
 (continue with topical verses)

22. DASHING AWAY WITH THE
    SMOOTHING IRON.
'Twas on a Monday morning
When I beheld my darling;
She looked so neat and charming
In ev'ry high degree;
She looked so neat and nimble, O
A-washing of her linen,O,
Dashing away with the smoothing
 iron,
Dashing away with the smoothing
 iron,
She stole my heart away.

'Twas on a Tuesday morning,
 (When I beheld my darling; etc.
A-hanging out her linen, O,
 (Dashing away              etc.

'Twas on a Wednesday morning,
 (When I beheld my darling; etc.
A-starching of her linen, O,
 (Dashing away              etc.

'Twas on a Thursday morning,
 (When I beheld my darling; etc.
A-ironing of her linen, O,
 (Dashing away              etc.
 

'Twas on a Friday morning,
 (When I beheld my darling; etc.
A-folding of her linen, O,
 (Dashing away              etc.

'Twas on a Saturday morning,
 (When I beheld my darling;  etc.
A-airing of her linen,O,
 (Dashing away               etc.

'Twas on a Sunday morning,
 (When I beheld my darling;  etc.
A-wearing of her linen,O,
 (Dashing away               etc.

23. DONKEY RIDING.
Were you ever in Quebec,
Stowing timber on the deck?,
Where there's a king with a
                golden crown,
Riding on a donkey.

CHORUS:-
Hey ho and away we go,
Donkey riding, donkey riding,
Hey ho and away we go,
Riding on a donkey.

Were you ever off the Horn,
Where it's always fine and warm,
Seeing the lion and the unicorn,
Riding on a donkey.
CHORUS

Were you ever in Cardiff Bay,
Where the folks all shout "Hurray"
Here comes Johnny with his three
                       months pay,
Riding on a donkey.
CHORUS

24. EARLY ONE MORNING.
Early one morning, just as the sun
                        was rising,
I heard a maiden sing in the valley
 below.

CHORUS:-
O don't deceive me, O never leave me!
How could you use a poor maiden so.

Remember the vows that you made to
                         your Mary,
Remember the bower where you vowed to
                             be true,
CHORUS

O gay is the garland, and fresh are the
                                 roses,
I've culled from the garden to bind on
                              thy brow.
CHORUS

Thus sang the poor maiden, her sorrow
 bewailing,
Thus sang the poor maid in the valley
 below.
CHORUS

25. FIRE DOWN BELOW.
Fire in the Galley, fire down below,
It's fetch a bucket of water boys,
There's fire down below.

CHORUS:-
Fire, fire, fire down below,
It's fetch a bucket of water boys,
There's fire down below.

Fire in the fore-top, fire in the main,
It's fetch a bucket of water boys,
And put it out again.

CHORUS

Fire in the fore-peak, fire down below,
It's fetch a bucket of water boys,
There's fire down below.
CHORUS
Fire in the windlass, fire in the
 chain,
It's fetch a bucket of water boys,
And put it out again.

CHORUS

Fire up aloft, and fire down below,
It's fetch a bucket of water boys,
There's fire down below.

CHORUS

26. FOUND A PEANUT.
Found a peanut, found a peanut,
Found a peanut right now,
Found a peanut, found a peanut,
Found a peanut listen now.

Thought I'd eat it, thought I'd eat it
Thought I'd eat it right now,
Thought I'd eat it, thought I'd eat it
Thought I'd eat it right now.

Found it mushy,,,,,,.right now.
Got a tummy pain,,,,.right now.
Get a doctor,,,,,,,,.right now.
Appendicitis,,,,,,,,.right now.
He cut me open,,,,,,.right now.
Traced the peanut,,,,right now.
Sewed me up agin,,,,.right now.
Lost the tweezers,,,,right now.
He cut me open,,,,,,.right now.
Found the tweezers,,.right now.
Sewed me up again,,,,right now.
Found a peanut,,,,,,.right now.

27. GHOSTS TALE.
Have you ever thought as a hearse goes
 by
That one of these days you are going
                              to die?

CHORUS:-
Oooo Oooo Ooo Ooo
Where shall we be in a hundred years
                            from now?

They nail you up in a wooden box,
And fill the gaps with stones and
 rocks,

CHORUS

They lower you down on a rotten rope,
It's just your luck if the dam thing
 broke,

CHORUS

The worms crawl in, the worms crawl
 out,
They crawl in thin and crawl out stout,

CHORUS

Your eyes fall in, your teeth fall out,
Your brain comes drifting down your
 snout

CHORUS

The moral of this tale belated,
Is-Don't be buried but be cremated.
CHORUS

28. GING GANG GOO.
Ging gang gooli gooli gooli gooli
Watcha Ging gang goo, ging gang goo,
Ging gang gooli gooli gooli gooli
Watcha Ging gang goo, ging gang goo,
Heyla heyla sheyla heyla sheyla
                           heyla Ho.
Heyla heyla sheyla heyla sheyla
                           heyla Ho.
Shali walli shali walli shali walli
                         shali walli
Oompah, oompah,,,,,,

29. GOOD-NIGHT LADIES.
Good-night, ladies, (x3)
We're going to leave you now.
Merrily we roll along, roll along,
 roll along,
Merrily we roll along, o'er the dark
 blue sea.

30. GRAND OLD DUKE OF YORK.
CHORUS:-
Oh the Grand Old Duke of York
He had ten thousand men,
He marched them up to the top of
 of the hill
And marched them down again.
And when they were up they were up
And when they were down they
 were down,
And when they were only half way up
They were neither up nor down.

31. GRANDFATHER'S CLOCK.
My grandfather's clock was too large
 for the shelf,
So it stood ninety years on the floor,
It was taller by half than the old
 man himself,
Though it weighed not a pennyweight
 more.
It was bought on the morn of the day
 when he was born,
And was always his treasure and pride,
But it stopped short, never to go again
When the old man died.
CHORUS:-
Ninety years without slumbering,
Tick tock, tick tock,
His life's seconds numbering,
Tick tock, tick tock.
It stopped short, never to go again,
When the old man died.

In watching its pendulum swing too
 and fro,
Many hours had been spent as a boy,
And in childhood and manhood the clock
 seemed to know
And to share both his grief and his
 joy.
For it struck twenty four when he
 entered at the door
With a blooming and beautiful bride,
But it stopped short, never to go again
When the old man died.
CHORUS

My grandfather said out of those he
 could hire
Not a servant so faithful he found,
For it wasted no time and had but one
 desire
At the close of its week to be wound.
And it kept in its place, not a frown
 on its face
And its hands never hung by its side,
But it stopped short, never to go again
When the old man died.
CHORUS

It rang an alarm in the dead of the
 night
An alarm that for years had been dumb,
And we knew that his spirit was pluming
 for flight
That his hour of departure had come.
Still the clock kept the time,
 with a soft muffled chime
As we silently stood by its side,
But it stopped short, never to go
 again.
When the old man died.    CHORUS

32. GREAT AMERICAN RAILWAY.
In eighteen hundred and sixty-one
The American Railway was begun,
The American Railway was begun
The Great American Railway.
CHORUS:-
Patsy-atsy-or-ee-ay,
Patsy-atsy-or-ee-ay,
Patsy-atsy-or-ee-ay,
The Great American Railway.

In eighteen hundred and sixty-two
I found myself with nothing to do,
I found myself with nothing to do
Beside the American Railway.
CHORUS

In eighteen hundred and sixty-three
The overseer accepted me,
The overseer accepted me
For working on the American Railway.
CHORUS

In eighteen hundred and sixty-four
My hands were tired and my feet
 were sore,
My hands were tired and my feet
 were sore
From working on the Railway.
CHORUS

In eighteen hundred and sixty-five
I found myself more dead than alive,
I found myself more dead than alive
From work on the American Railway.
CHORUS
In eighteen hundred and sixty-six
I happened to tread on some dynamite
                              sticks,
I happened to tread on some dynamite
                              sticks
While working on the Railway.
CHORUS
In eighteen hundred and sixty-seven
I found myself half way to heaven,
I found myself half way to heaven
Above the American Railway.
CHORUS
In eighteen hundred and sixty-eight
I found my way through the Golden Gate
I found my way through the Golden Gate
Above the American Railway.
CHORUS

In eighteen hundred and sixty-nine
A Cherub's harp and wings were mine,
A Cherub's harp and wings were mine
Above the American Railway.
CHORUS

In eighteen hundred and sixty-ten
If you want any more you can sing
 it again,
If you want any more you can sing
 it again
About the American Railway.
CHORUS

33. GREEN AND YELLOW.
Where have you been this day,
Hen-ery my son?
Where have you been this day
My pretty one?

In the woods, In the woods
Oh, Mother do be quick, 'cos I'm
 feeling very sick
And I want t'lay me down and die.

What did you in them woods,
Hen-ery my son?
What did you in them woods
My pretty one?

Ate some eels, Ate some eels,
Oh, Mother do be quick, 'cos I'm
 feeling very sick
And I want t'lay me down and die.

What colour was them eels
Hen-ery my son?
What colour was them eels
My pretty one?

GREEN AND YELLER! (said with repulsion)
GREEN AND YELLER! (even worse)
Oh, mother do be quick, 'cos I'm
 feeling very sick
And I want t'lay me down and die.

Them's eels was snakes,
Hen-ery my son,,. etc.

Oh, dear Mother,,.

What colour flowers
Hen-ery my son?,,,,.

Green and Yeller,,,,

34. GREEN GROW THE RUSHES OH.
I'll sing you one-ho,

CHORUS:-
Green grow the rushes-ho,
What is your (one)-ho,

One is one and all alone
And ever more shall be so.

I'll sing you two-ho.
CHORUS

Two two the lilly white boys
Clothed all in green-ho.

Three three the rivals.

Four for the Gospel makers.

Five for the Symbols at your door.

Six for the six proud walkers.

Seven for the seven stars in the sky.

Eight for the April rainers.

Nine for the nine bright shiners.

Ten for the ten comandments.

Eleven for the eleven who went
                     to heaven.

Twelve for the twelve Apostles.

35. GYPSY ROVER.
The gypsy rover came over the hill
Down through the valley so shady,
He whistled and sang till
             the greenwoods rang,
And he won the heart of a lady.

CHORUS:-
Ardy-doo, Ardy-doo-da-day,
Ardy-doo, Ardy-day-o,
He whistled and he sang till
          the greenwoods rang
And he won the heart of a lady.

She left her father's castle great,
Left her own fond lover,
Left her servants and her state,
To follow the gypsy rover.

CHORUS

Her father saddled his fastest steed
And searched his valleys all over,
Seeking his daughter at great speed,
And the whistling gypsy rover.

CHORUS

At last he came to the castle gate,
Along the river shady,
And there was music and there was wine
For the gypsy and his lady.

CHORUS

"He is no gypsy, my father," she said,
"but lord of these lands all over,
And I will stay till my dying day,
With my whistling gypsy rover."
CHORUS

36. I'VE GOT SIXPENCE.
I've got sixpence, jolly, jolly
 sixpence,
I've got sixpence, to last me all my
 life.
I've got twopence to spend, and
 twopence to lend,
And twopence to send home to my wife.

CHORUS:-
No cares have I to grieve me,
No pretty little maid to deceive me.
I'm happy as a king, believe me,
As I go rolling home.

I've got fourpence,,,,
Twopence to spend, and twopence to
 lend,
And nothing to take home to my wife.

CHORUS

I've got twopence,,,,
Twopence to spend, and nothing to
 lend,
And nothing to take home to my wife.

CHORUS

I've got nothing,,,,etc,,.

CHORUS

37. IF YOU'RE HAPPY.
If you're happy and you know it,
 Clap your hands,
If you're happy and you know it,
 Clap your hands,
If you're happy and you know it,
 And you really want to show it,
If your happy and you know it,
 Clap your hands!

Actions for other verses:-
 Stamp your feet.
 Snap your fingers.
 Slap your thighs.
 Say A-men.
 Do all five.

38. ILKLEY MOOR.
Where have you been since I saw thee
On Ilkley Moor bacht hat?
Where have you been since I saw thee
Where have you been since I saw thee

CHORUS:-
On Ilkley Moor bacht hat
On Ilkley Moor bacht hat
On Ilkley Moor bacht hat.

I've been a-coortin Mary Jane
On Ilkley Moor bacht hat, etc,,.

CHORUS

Thou'll surely catch thy death of cold
On Ilkley Moor bacht hat, etc,,.

CHORUS

Then we will have to bury thee
On Ilkley Moor bacht hat, etc,,.

CHORUS

Then wurms will come and ate thee up
On Ilkley Moor bacht hat, etc,,.
CHORUS

Then ducks will gobble up dem wurms
On Ilkley Moor bacht hat, etc,,.
CHORUS

Then you can come and eat up ducks
And so get back your own
May be they will poison thee
Then you'll keep me company.
CHORUS

(This version of Ilkley Moor taken
 from numerous different versions
 from different sources).

39. JAMAICA FAREWELL.
Down the way, where the nights are gay
And the sun shines daily on the
 mountain top,
I took a trip on a sailing ship
But when I reached Jamaica I made a
 stop.

CHORUS:-

But I'm sad to say, I'm on my way,
Won't be back for many a day,
My heart is down my head is turning
 around,
I had to leave a little girl in
 Kingston town.

Down at the market you can hear
Ladies cry out as on their heads they
 bear
Ackee rice and salt fish are nice
And the rum is fine any time of year.

CHORUS

Sounds of laughter everywhere,
And the dancing girls swing to and fro
I must declare that my heart is there
Though I've been from Maine down to
 Mexico.

CHORUS

40. JOHN PEEL.
D'ye ken John Peel with his coat so
 gay,
D'ye ken John Peel at the break of
 day,
D'ye ken John Peel when he's far away,
With his hounds and his horn in the
 morning.

For the sound of his horn brought me
 from my bed
And the cry of his hounds which he
 oft times led,
Peel's 'view hullo' would awaken the
 dead
Or the fox from his lair in the
 morning.

Yes I ken John Peel and Ruby too
Ranter and Ringwood and Bellman and
 True,
From a find to a check, from a check
 to a view
From a view to a death in the morning

Then here's to John Peel with my
 heart and soul
Let's drink to his health, let's
 finish the bowl,
We'll follow John Peel through fair
 and through foul
If we want a good hunt in the morning.

41. JOHNNY SMOKER.
Johnny Smoker, Johnny Smoker,
Ich kann spielen, ich kann spielen
Ich kann spielen mein kliener
 Trommel.Rumadumadum das ist mein
 Trommel
Mit mein Rumadumadum, das ist mein
 Trommel.

Johnny Smoker, Johnny Smoker,
Ich kann spielen, ich kann spielen
Ich kann spielen mein kliener
 Pfeife. Piliwiliwee,das ist mein
 Pfeife,
Mit mein Rumadumadum, mein Piliwiliwee
 das ist mein Pfeife.

For other verses add:-

Triangel,,,,,,,,,,.tin-tan-ton
Zimbel,,,,,,,,,,,,.zum-zum-zum
Viola,,,,,,,,,,,,,,fa-la-la
Trombone,,,,,,,,,,.um-pah-pah
Dudelsack,,,,,,,,,,vacca-vacca-vac

42. KEEPER.
The keeper did a hunting go
And under his cloak he carried a bow
All for to shoot of a merry little
 doe
Among the leaves so green O.

CHORUS:- (2 parts)
1. Jacky Boy
2. Master
1. Sing ye well
2. Very Well
1. Hey Down
2. Ho down
1. Derry derry down
 Amongst the leaves go green O. (both)
1. To my hey down, down
2. To my ho down, down
1. Hey Down
2. Ho Down
1. Derry derry down
 Amongst the leaves so green O. (both)

The first doe he shot and he missed
The second doe he trimmed, he kissed,
The third doe went where nobody whist
Amongst the leaves so green O.

CHORUS

The fourth doe she did cross the plain
The keeper fetched her back again,
Where she is now she may remain
Amongst the leaves so green O.

CHORUS

The fifth doe she did cross the brook
The keeper fetched her back with his
 crook,
Where she is now you must go and look
 Amongst the leaves go green O.

CHORUS

The sixth doe she ran o'er the plain
But he with his hounds did turn her
 again,
And there he did hunt in a merry
 merry vein
Amongst the leaves so green O.

CHORUS
43. KOOKABURRA.
A Kookaburra sits in an old gum tree,
Merry, merry king of the bush is he,
Laugh Kookaburra, laugh Kookaburra,
Gay your life must be.

44. KUM-BA-YAH.
Kum-ba-yah my Lord, Kum-ba-yah,
Kum-ba-yah my Lord, Kum-ba-yah,
Kum-ba-yah my Lord, Kum-ba-yah,
Oh Lord, Kum-ba-yah.

Someone's crying Lord, Kum-ba-yah, etc.

Someone's laughing Lord, Kum-ba-yah,etc
Someone's praying Lord, Kum-ba-yah, etc

Someone's singing Lord, Kum-ba-yah, etc

Kum-ba-yah my Lord, Kum-ba-yah, etc.
 

45. LAND OF THE SILVER BIRCH.
Land of the silver birch, home of the
 beaver,
Where still the mighty moose wanders at
 will,

CHORUS:-
Blue lake and rocky shore,
I will return once more,
Boom did-di-eye-di, Boom did-di-eye-di,
Boom did-di-eye-di, Boooom.

My heart is sick for you here in the
 lowlands,
I will return to you, hills of the
 North.

CHORUS

Swift as a silver fish, canoe of birch
 bark,
Thy mighty waterways carry me forth.

CHORUS

There, where the blue lake lies I'll
 set my wigwam,
Close to the water's edge, silent and
 still.

CHORUS

46. LEAVING OF LIVERPOOL.
Farewell the Price's landing stage,
River Mersey, fare thee well,
For I'm bound for Californi-aye
It's a place that I know right well.

CHORUS:-
So fare thee well, my own true love,
When I return united we will be.
It's not the leaving of Liverpool
 that grieves me,
But my darling when I think of thee.

Yes, I'm bound for Californi-aye,
By the way of the stormy Cape Horn,
And I'll write you a letter my love,
When I'm a home-ward bound.

CHORUS

I have signed on a Yankee clipper ship,
Davy Crockett is her name,
And the captain's name it is Burgess,
And they say she's a floating shame.

CHORUS

It's my second time with Burgess in
 Crockett,
And I reckon I know him well,
If a man is a sailor he'll get along,
If he's not, well, he's sure in Hell
CHORUS

The sun is on the harbour, love,
I wish I could remain,
But I know it's going to be a
 long time,
Before I see you again.
CHORUS

47. LITTLE BROWN JUG.
My wife and I liv'd all alone,
In a little log-hut we called our own,
She lov'd gin and I lov'd rum,
I tell you what, we'd lots of fun.

CHORUS:-
Ha, ha, ha, you and me,
"Little Brown Jug" don't I love thee.
Ha, ha, ha, you and me,
"Little Brown Jug" don't I love thee.

When I go toiling to my farm,
I take little "Brown Jug" under my arm,
I place it under a shady tree-
Little "Brown Jug" 'tis you and me.

CHORUS

If I'd a cow that gave such milk
I'd clothe her in the finest silk,
I'd feed her on the choicest hay,
And milk her forty times a day.

CHORUS

The rose is red, my nose is too,
The violet's blue and so are you,
And yet I guess before I stop,
We'd better take another drop.

CHORUS

48. LOCH LOMOND.
By yon bonnie banks, and by yon
 bonnie braes,
Where the sun shines bright on
 Loch Lomond,
Where me and my true love were
 ever want to gae,
On the bonnie, bonnie banks of
 Loch Lomond.

CHORUS:-
Oh! ye'll tak' the high road
 and I'll tak' the low road,
And I'll be in Scotland before ye:
But me and my true love will
 never meet again,
On the bonnie, bonnie banks of
 Loch Lomond.

'Twas there that we parted, in
 yon shady glen,
On the steep, steep side o' Ben
 Lomond,
Where, in purple hue, the
 Hielan' hills we view,
And the moon comin' out in the
 gloamin'.
CHORUS

The wee birdies sing and the
 wild flowers spring,
And in sunshine the waters are
 sleepin',
But the broken heart will ken
 nae second spring again,
Tho' the waefu' may cease frae
 their greetin.
CHORUS

49. LORD OF THE DANCE.
I danced in the morning
When the world was begun,
And I danced in the moon
And the stars and the sun;
And I came down from heaven
And I danced on the earth,
At Bethlehem I had my birth.

CHORUS:-
Dance then, wherever you may be,
I am the Lord of the Dance, said he,
And I'll lead you all wherever you
 may be,
And I'll lead you all in the dance,
 said he.

I danced for the scribe
And the pharisee,
But they would not dance
And they wouldn't follow me,
I danced for the fishermen,
For James and John -
They came with me
And the dance went on.

CHORUS

I danced on the Sabbath
And I cured the lame;
The holy people
Said it was a shame.
They whipped and they stripped
And they hung me on high,
And they left me there
On a cross to die.

CHORUS

I danced on a Friday
When the sky turned black;
It's hard to dance
With the devil on your back.
They buried my body
And they thought I'd gone;
But I am the dance
And I still go on.

CHORUS

They cut me down
And I leapt up high;
I am the life
That'll never, never die.
I'll live in you
If you'll live in me;
I am the Lord of the Dance, said he.

CHORUS

50. MANCHESTER RAMBLER.
I've been over Snowdon
I've slept up on Crowdon,
I've camped by the Wain Stones as well
I've sunbathed on Kinder,
Been burnt to a cinder,
And many more things I could tell.
My rucksac has oft been my pillow,
The heather has oft been my bed,
And sooner than part from the
 mountains
I think I would rather be dead.

CHORUS:-
I'm a rambler,
 I'm a rambler from Manchester way,
I get all me pleasure
 the hard moorland way,
I may be a wage slave on Monday,
But I am a free man on Sunday.

The day was just ending
As I was descending,
By Grimesbrook just by Upper Tor,
When a voice cried "Hey you"
In a way Keepers do,
He'd the worst face that I ever saw.
The things that he said were unpleasant
In the teeth of his fury I said,
Sooner than part from the mountains
I think I would rather be dead.

CHORUS

Well he called me a louse,
And he said "Mind the grouse",
And I tried but still couldn't see.
Why on Kinder scout,
And the moors roundabout,
Wasn't room for the poor grouse and me.
He said all these lands were his
 masters
At this I stood shaking my head,
No man has a claim to the mountains
No more than the deep ocean bed.

CHORUS

I once loved a maid,
A spot-welder by trade,
She was fair as the rowan in bloom;
And the blue of her eye,
Matched the June moorland sky,
And I wooed her from April to June.
On the day that I should have been
 married,
I went for a ramble instead
For sooner than part from the mountains
I think I would rather be dead.
CHORUS
There's pleasure in dragging,
Through peat bogs and bragging,
Of all kinds of walks that you know.
There's even a measure,
Of some kind of pleasure,
In wadding through three feet of snow.
I've stood on the edge of the down-fore
And seen all the valley outspread,
And sooner than part from the mountains
I think I would rather be dead.

CHORUS

So I walk where I will,
Over mountain and hill,
And I lie where the bracken is deep,
I belong to the mountains,
The clear-running fountains
Where the grey rocks rise rugged and
 steep.
I've seen the white hare in the gully
And the curlew fly high overhead,
And sooner than part from the mountains
I think I would rather be dead

CHORUS

51. MARCHING THROUGH GEORGIA.
Bring the good old bugle boys
 we'll sing another song,
Sing it with a spirit that will
 start the world along,
Sing it as we used to sing it
 fifty-thousand strong,
While we were marching through
 Georgia.

CHORUS:-
Hurrah! Hurrah! We bring the
 Jubilee
Hurrah! Hurrah! the flag that
 makes you free.
So we sang the chorus from
 Atlanta to the sea,
While we were marching through
 Georgia.

How the darkies shouted when they
 heard the joyful sound,
How the turkeys gobbled which our
 commissary found.
How the sweet potatoes even started
 from the ground,
While we were marching through
 Georgia.

CHORUS

Yes, and there were Union men who
 wept with joyful tears,
When they saw the honoured flag
 they had not seen for years.
Hardly could they be restrained
 from breaking out in cheers,
While we were marching through
 Georgia.
CHORUS

"Shermans dashing Yankee boys will
 never reach the coast,"
So the saucy rebels said and 'twas
 a handsome boast.
Had they not forgot, alas, to
 reckon with the host,
While we were marching through
 Georgia.
CHORUS

So we made a thoroughfare for
 freedom and her train,
Sixty miles in latitude, three
 hundred to the main,
Treason fled before us, for
 resistance was in vain,
While we were marching through
 Georgia.
CHORUS

52. MICHAEL FINNAGAN.
There was an old man named Michael
 Finnagen,
He grew whiskers on his chinagen,
The wind came out and blew them in agen
Poor old Michael Finnagen, begin agen.

There was an old man named Michael
 Finnagen,
He got drunk through drinking ginagen,
Thus he wasted all his tinnagen,
Poor old Michael Finnagen, begin agen.

There was an old man named
 Michael Finnagen,
He kicked up an awful dinagen,
Because they said he must not sinagen,
Poor old Michael Finnagen, begin agen.

There was an old man named Michael
 Finnagen,
He went fishing with a Pinagen,
Caught a fish but dropped it in
 again,
Poor old Michael Finnagen, begin
 agen.

There was an old man named Michael
 Finnagen,
Climbed a tree and barked his
 shinagen,
Took off several yards of skinagen,
Poor old Michael Finnagen,
 begin agen.

There was an old man named Michael
 Finnagen,
He grew fat and then grew thin agen,
Then he died and had to begin agen,
Poor old Michael Finnagen,
 begin agen.

53. MULE SONG.
On mules we find,
Two legs behind,
And two we find before,
We stand behind,
Before we find,
What the two behind be for.

If you stand behind,
The two behind,
You find what they be for,
So stand behind,
The two behind,
And behind the two before.

54. THE MUSIC MAN.
I am the music man,
I come from down your way,
And I do play,
What do you play,
I play the (piano)

The pi-a, pi-a, piano,
Piano, Piano,
The pi-a, pi-a, piano,
Pi-a, pi-a-no.

verse 2: bagpipes
      3: big base drum
      4: trombone
      5: violin
etc,,., etc.

55. O JESUS I HAVE PROMISED.
O Jesus I have promised
To serve Thee to the end;
Be Thou for ever near me,
My Master and my Friend:
I shall not fear the battle
If thou art by my side,
Nor wander from the pathway
If Thou wilt be my Guide.

O let me feel Thee near me;
The world is ever near;
I see the sights that dazzle,
The tempting sounds I hear;
My foes are ever near me,
Around me and within;
But, Jesus, draw Thou nearer,
And shield my soul from sin.

O let me hear Thee speaking
In accents clear and still,
Above the storms of passion,
The murmurs of self-will;
O speak to reassure me,
To chasten or control;
O speak, and make me listen,
Thou Guardian of my soul.

O Jesus Thou hast promised,
To all who follow Thee,
That were Thou art in glory
There shall Thy servant be;
And, Jesus, I have promised
To serve Thee to the end:
O give me grace to follow,
My Master and my friend.

56. ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI.
On top of spaghetti; all covered
 in cheese,
I lost my poor meat-ball; when
 somebody sneezed.

It rolled off the table; and onto
 the floor,
And then my poor meat-ball; rolled
 out of the door.

It rolled down the garden; and under
 a bush,
And then my poor meat-ball was
 nothing but mush.

If you have spaghetti; all covered
 in cheese,
Hold on to your meatball, 'cos
 someone might sneeze!!

57. PING-PONG BALL.
A guy had a game with a ping-pong ball
A guy had a game with a ping-pong
 ball,
Oh a guy had a game with a ping-pong
 ball,
With a ping with a ping-pong ball.

Oh a guy had a game with a ping-pong,
 ping-pong, ping-pong, ping-pong,
 ping-pong ball,
With a ping, with a ping, with a
 ping-pong, ping-pong, ping-pong,
 ping-pong ball.

Ping, ping, ping, ping, ping, ping,
 ping, ping, ping!

Oh a guy had a game with a ping-pong
 ball,
A guy had a game with a ping-pong
 ball,
A guy had a game with a ping-pong
 ball,
With a ping, with a ping-pong ball.

58. QUARTERMASTERS STORES.
CHORUS:-
My eyes are dim I cannot see
I have not brought my specs with me,
I have not brought my specs with me,

There were rats, rats, as big as
 pussy cats
In the stores, in the stores,
There were rats, rats, as big as
 pussy cats
In the quartermasters stores.
CHORUS

There was Sam, Sam, eating all the
 spam, etc,,, etc,,.

59. SEVEN DRUNKEN NIGHTS.
As I went home on Monday night
As drunk as drunk could be,
I saw a horse outside the door
Where my old horse should be.
Well I called me wife and I said
 to her,
"Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns that horse outside the door
Where my old horse should be?"

CHORUS:-
"You're drunk, you're drunk
you silly old fool.
And still you cannot see!
That's a lovely sow that me mother
 sent to me."

"Well it's many a day I've travelled
A hundred miles or more
But a saddle on a sow
Sure I never saw before."

As I went home on Tuesday night
As drunk as drunk could be
I saw a coat behind the door
Where my old coat should be,,,,,,,,
CHORUS

,,,.That's a woollen blanket that
    me mother sent to me
,,,.But buttons in a blanket,,,,

,,,.Wednesday night,,,,,,.
,,,.I saw a pipe upon the chair,,,,.
,,,.That's a lovely tin whistle,,,,.
,,,.But tobacco in a tin whistle,,,,

,,,.Thursday,,,,,,
,,,.I saw two boots behind the bed,,.
,,,.They're two lovely geranium pots,,
,,,.But laces in geranium pots,,,,.

,,,.Friday,,,,.
,,,.I saw a head upon the bed,,,,.
,,,.That's a lovely baby boy me
    mother sent to me
,,,.But a baby boy with whiskers on,,,

60. SHE'LL BE COMING ROUND THE M'TAIN.
She'll be coming round the mountain
 when she comes,
She'll be coming round the mountain
 when she comes,
She'll be coming round the mountain,
Coming round the mountain,
Coming round the mountain when she
 comes.

2. She'll be driving six white
    horses when she comes.

3. O we'll all go out to meet her
    when she comes

4. We will kill the old red rooster
    when she comes.

5. And we'll all have chicken and
    dumpling when she comes.

61. STRANGEST DREAM.
Last night I had the strangest dream
I'd ever dreamed before,
I dreamed the world had all agreed
To put an end to war.
I dreamed I saw a mighty room
The room was full of men;
And the paper they were signing said
They'd never fight again.

And when the paper was all signed
And a million copies made,
They all joined hands and bowed their
 heads
And grateful prayers were prayed.
And the people in the streets below
Were dancing round and round,
While swords and guns and uniforms
Were scattered on the ground.

62. SUCKING CIDER.
The sweetest girl I ever saw
Was sucking cider through a straw.

I said to her "Pretty girl what for
Do you suck cider through a straw?

Then suddenly it occurred to me
To take the damsel on my knee.

She said to me, "There ain't no law
'Gainst sucking cider through a straw."

So cheek to cheek and jaw by jaw
We both suck cider through a straw.

And now I've got a mother-in-law
Through sucking cider through a
 straw.

63. TARPAULIN JACKET.
A tall stalwart lancer lay dying,
And as on his death bed he lay, he
 lay,
To his friends who around him were
 sighing
These last dying words he did say:

CHORUS:-
Wrap me up in my tarpaulin jacket,
And say a poor buffer lies low,
 lies low,
And six stalwart lancers shall
 carry me,
With steps solemn, mournful, and
 slow.

Had I the wings of a little dove,
Far, far away would I fly, I'd fly,
Straight for the arms of my true
 love;
And there would I lay me and die.

CHORUS

Then get you two little white
 tombstones,
Put one at my head and my toe,
 my toe,
And get you a penknife and scratch
 there;
Here lies a poor buffer below".

CHORUS

And get you six brandies and sodas,
And set them all out in a row,
 a row,
And get you six jolly good fellows,
To drink to this buffer below.

CHORUS

And then in the calm of the
 twilight,
When the soft winds are whispering
 low, so low,
And the darkening shadows are
 falling,
Sometimes think of this buffer
 below.

CHORUS

64. TAVERN IN THE TOWN.
There is a tavern in the town, in the
 town,
And there my true love sits him down,
 sits him down,
And drinks his wine 'mid laughter free,
And never, never thinks of me.

CHORUS:-
Fare thee well, for I must leave thee,
Do not let this parting grieve thee,
But remember that the best of friends
 must part, must part.
Adieu, adieu, kind friends, adieu,
 adieu, adieu,
I can no longer stay with you, stay
 with you
I'll hang my harp on a weeping willow
 tree
And may the world go well with thee.

He left me for a damsel dark, damsel
 dark
Each Friday night they used to spark,
 used to spark,
And now my love once true to me
Takes that dark damsel on his knee.

CHORUS
 

Oh! dig my grave both wide and deep,
 wide and deep,
Put tombstones at my head and feet,
 head and feet,
And on my breast carve a turtle dove,
To signify I died of love
CHORUS

65. TEN GREEN BOTTLES.
There were ten green bottles standing
 on a wall
Ten green bottles standing on a wall,
If one green bottle should accidently
 fal
There'd be nine green bottles standing
 on the wall.

Nine green bottles ,,,. (down to none)

66. THANK YOU.
Thank you for giving me this morning
Thank you for every day that's new.
Thank you that I can know my worries
Can be cost to you.

Thank you for all my friends and
 brothers,
Thank you for all the men that live,
Thank you for even greatest enemies
That I can forgive.

Thank you I have my occupation,
Thank you for every pleasure small,
Thank you for music, light and
 gladness,
Thank you for them all.

Thank you for many little sorrows,
Thank you for every kindly word,
Thank you that everywhere your
 guidance
Reaches every land.

Thank you I see your word has meaning,
Thank you, I know your spirits here
Thank you because you love all people,
Those both far and near.

Thank you, Oh lord you spoke unto us,
Thank you, that for our words you care,
Thank you, Oh lord you came amongst us
Bread and wine to share.

Thank you, Oh lord your love is
 boundless,
Thank you that I am full of you,
Thank you, you made me feel so glad
And thankful as I do.

67. THREE WOOD PIGEONS.
Three wood pidgeons, three wood
 pidgeons, three wood pidgeons
Sitting on a tree.
LOOK one of 'ems gone   AAHH!
Two wood pidgeons, etc.
Sitting on a tree.
OH there's another one gone.  Oo ow!
 (regretfully)
One wood pidgeon, etc.
Sitting on a tree.
(slow)No wood pidgeons, etc.
Sitting on a tree.
One of them's coming back  Hurrah!
One wood pidgeon, etc.
Sitting on a tree.
Here's another one.  Hurrah!
(quick) Two wood pidgeons, etc.
Sitting on a tree.
(yell) There's the other one back.
 Hurrah!
Three wood pidgeons, etc.
Sitting on a tree.

68. TIE ME KANGAROO DOWN.
Watch me Platypus Duck Bill,
Watch me Platypus Duck,
Don't let him run amuck Bill,
Watch me Platypus Duck.

CHORUS:-
Tie me Kangaroo down sport,
Tie me Kangaroo down,
Tie me Kangaroo down sport,
Tie me Kangaroo down.

CHORUS

Watch me Wallabies feet sport,
Watch me Wallabies feet.
They're a dangerous breed sport,
Watch me Wallabies feet.

CHORUS

Dig me Diggery Doo blue,
Dig me Diggery Doo.
That's the thing to do blue,
Dig me Diggery Doo.
CHORUS

Tan me hide when I'm dead Fred,
Tan me hide when I'm dead.
So they tanned his hide, when he
 died fried,
And that's it hanging on the shed.
CHORUS

69. WALTZING MATILDA.
Once a jolly swagman camped by a
 billabong,
Under the shade of a Coolabah tree;
And he sang as he watched and waited
 till his billy boiled,
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me!"

"Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda,
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me,"
And he sang as he watched and waited
 till his billy boiled
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me."

Down came a jumbuck to drink at the
 billabong,
Up jumped the swagman and grabbed
 him with glee;
And he sang as he shoved that
 jumbuck in his tucker bag,
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me."

"Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda,
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me,"
And he sang as he shoved that jumbuck
 in his tucker bag,
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me."

Up rode the squatter mounted on his
 thoroughbred,
Down came the troopers - one, two,
 three.
"Whose jolly jumbuck you've got in your
 tucker bag?
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me?.

"Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda,
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me,"
"Whose jolly jumbuck you've got in your
 tucker bag?
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me."

Up jumped the swagman, sprang into the
 billabong,
"You'll never catch me alive," said he,
And his ghost may be heard as you pass
 by that billabong,
"Who'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me?"

"Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda,
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me,"
And his ghost may be heard as you pass
 by that billabong,
"Who'll come a-waltzing Matilda with
 me?"

70. WE PLOUGH THE FIELDS AND SCATTER.
We plough the fields, and scatter
The good seed on the land,
But it is fed and watered
By God's almighty hand;
He sends the snow in winter,
The warmth to swell the grain,
The breezes, and the sunshine,
And soft refreshing rain.

CHORUS:-
All good gifts around us
Are sent from heaven above;
Then thank the Lord, O thank the Lord,
For all His love.

He only is the Maker
Of all things near and far;
He paints the wayside flower,
He lights the evening star;
The winds and waves obey Him,
By Him the birds are fed;
Much more to us, His children,
He gives our daily bread.

CHORUS

We thank Thee then, O father,
For all things bright and good,
The seed-time and the harvest,
Our life, our health, our food;
Accept the gifts we offer
For all Thy love imparts,
And, what Thou most desirest,
Our humble, thankful hearts.

CHORUS

71. WEB-FOOTED FRIENDS.
Be kind to your web-footed friends
For a duck may be somebody's mother,
It lives all alone in the swamp,
Where the weather is always damp.
You may think that this is the end,
Well it is, but to prove that I'm a
 liar,
I'm going to sing it again,
Only this time I'm going to sing it
 higher.

72. WHAT SHALL WE DO WITH THE DRUNKEN
     SAILOR.
What shall we do with the drunken
 sailor x3
Early in the morning?

CHORUS:-
Hooray and up she rises, (x3)
Early in the morning.

Put him in the long-boat 'till he's
 sober,,.

Pull out the plug and wet him all
 over,,.

Put him in the scuppers with a
 hose-pipe on him,,.

Heave him by the leg in a running
 bowlin!,,.

Tie him on the taffrail when she's
 yard-arm under,,.

That's what we'll do with the drunken
 sailor,,.

73. WHEN I FIRST CAME TO THIS LAND.
When I first came to this land,
I was not a wealthy man.
So I got myself a shack,
I did what I could.

And I called my shack, "Break my
 back".
Oh, the land was sweet and good,
I did what I could.

When I first came to this land,
I was not a wealthy man,
So I got myself a cow,
I did what I could.

And I called my cow, "No milk now"
And I called my shack, "Break my
 back".
Oh, the land was sweet and good,
I did what I could.

,,,,.So I got myself a hen,,.
And I called my hen, "Now and then"

,,,,.So I got myself a donkey,,.
And I called my donkey, "Horse gone
 wonkey!"

,,,,.So I got myself a wife,,.
And I called my wife, "Trouble and
 strife".

,,,,.So I got myself a son,,.
And I called my son, "My work done".

74. WIDDICOMBE FAIR.
Tom Pearce, Tom Pearce lend me your
 grey mare,
All along down along, out long lea,
For I want to go to Widdicombe Fair
With Bill Brewer, Jan Stewer, Peter
 Gurney, Peter Davy, Dan'l Widdon,
 Harry Hawke,
Old Uncle Tom Cobleigh and all.

And when shall I see again my grey mare
By Friday soon or Saturday noon.

Then Friday came and Saturday noon,
But Tom Pearce's old mare has not
 trotted home.

So Tom Pearce he got up to the top of
 the hill,
And he seed his old mare down a-making
 her will.

So Tom Pearce's old grey mare took sick
 and died,
And Tom he sat down on a stone and he
 cried.

But this isn't the end of this shocking
 affair,
Nor though they be dead of the horrid
 career.

When the wind whistles cold on the moor
 of a night,
Tom Pearce's old mare doth appear
 ghastly white.

And all the long night be heard
 skirling the groans,
From Tom Pearce's old mare and her
 rattling bones.

75. WILD ROVER.
I've been a wild rover for many
 a year,
And I've spent all me money on
 whiskey and beer,
And now I'm returning with wealth
 in great store,
And I never will play the wild
 rover no more.

CHORUS:-
And it's no, nay, never,
No nay never, no more,
Will I play the wild rover,
No nay never, no more.

I went to an alehouse I used to
 frequent,
And I told the landlady my money
 was spent,
I asked her for credit, she answered
 me nay,
Such custom as yours I can get
 any day.

CHORUS

I took from me pocket ten
 sovereigns bright,
And the landlady's eyes opened
 wide with delight.
She said "I have whisky and wines
 of the best,
And the words I've just told you
 were only in jest.

CHORUS

I'll go home to my parents, confess
 what I've done,
And I'll ask them to pardon their
 prodigcal son,
And when they've caressed me
 like oft times before,
I never will play the wild rover
 no more.

CHORUS

76. WOODPECKERS HOLE.
I put my finger in a woodpecker's
 hole
The woodpecker said, 'Why bless my
 soul,
Take it out! Take it out!
REMOOOOOVE IT!'

I removed my hand from the
 woodpecker's hole,
And the woodpecker said, 'Why bless
 my soul,
Put it back! Put it back!
REPLAAAAACE IT!'

I replaced my hand in the woodpecker's
 hole,
And the woodpecker said, 'Why bless my
 soul,
Turn it round! Turn it round!
REVOOOOOLVE IT!'

I revolved my hand in the woodpecker's
 hole,
And the woodpecker said, 'Why bless my
 soul,
The other way! The other way!
REVEEEEERSE IT!'

I reversed my hand in the woodpecker's
 hole,
And the woodpecker said, 'Why bless my
 soul,
Take it out! Take it out!
REMOOOOOVE IT!'

I removed my hand from the woodpecker's
 hole,
And the woodpecker said, 'Why bless my
 soul,
Put your head in! Put your head in!
Put your head in!'

I put my head in the woodpecker's hole,
And the woodpecker said, 'Pinhead!'

77. WORM SONG.
Nobody loves me; everybody hates me
Just 'cos I eat worms!
Long, thin slimy ones, short fat
 fuzzy ones;
See them squiggle and squirm.

The long thin slimy ones slide down
 easily,
The short fat fuzzy ones stick.
The short fat fuzzy ones stick in
 your teeth,
And the juice goes 'urlllch' like
 this!

I chop all the heads off, suck out
 the juice,
And throw all the skins away,
And nobody knows how I survive
On a hundred worms a day.
 
 
 
 
 

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